How to write the perfect email response to an enquiry

There are billions of emails flying around in cyberspace every single day, so it is important that your emails stand out from the crowd – especially from those of your competitors.

Texting

Chances are, you are not the only supplier the couple has reached out to as they begin the research phase of their wedding planning.

But standing out is a lot simpler than it might seem at first thought and a lot of it has to do with the manner in which you respond to email enquiries.

Young happy businesswoman working on laptop in the office.

Make it personal

If a couple has reached out to you, the best way to build a relationship is to ensure you give them a personalised response.

Avoid generic automatic response emails that overload potential clients with information that is irrelevant to them. This will undoubtedly find its way into the trash.

Instead, take the time to read and understand their enquiry and provide them with the specific information they require and what the next step would be, whether it is a phone call or for them to nominate a time to meet face to face.

She's focused on the task at hand

Start a conversation

If the couple have sent a simple request to enquire whether you are available for their preferred date, take this opportunity to express your desire to get to know more about them and what they had in mind for their day.

Be sure, however, to start your email with a clear request. This could be to make a time to contact one another or to ask them to email you more information about what they are looking for.

Engagement is the key here and your potential customers will need to feel like their needs are being addressed.

Saleswoman showing paperwork to couple

Keep It Simple, Stupid

The KISS principle has so many applications in life, and email is no exception.

Keep your email responses short and sweet – up to 125 words if you can. This allows you to get to the point efficiently and save your clients time wading through unnecessary text.

Use simple words and short sentences so there is no confusion about the message you are passing on to your clients.

Hand doing proofreading on a faulty text with red pen

Set the tone

Following the KISS principle will allow you to communicate on an open level, the words you use can have a powerful influence on the relationship you build with your client.

With most engaged couples in their 20s and 30s, they do not respond as openly to overly formal greetings and wordings, especially when they are trying to connect with suppliers to work with them on something as intimate as their wedding day.

Research shows that using emotional words like wonderful, delighted, and pleased will resonate with email recipients.

Keep this in mind when choosing the way you address the couple and continue this tone throughout the email.

With all of this in mind, let’s take a look at a couple of examples to galvanize these points…

Am I seeing this right?

Example of a bad email

Hi Doris,

Thanks for your enquiry.

Here below is my life story summed up in 9000 words.

I have attached a 35-page pdf document, which outlines every single feature of my services.

If you’re read this far, congratulations. I’ll now wait patiently by my phone for you to call re the next step.

Regards,

A very quiet wedding professional

Portrait of an attractive woman at table, praying position

Example of a good email

Hi Rhiannon,

Thanks so much for your message! Firstly – Yes, I am available. I’d be delighted to meet you and talk more. Most couples prefer to meet weeknight evenings. Is there a particular evening that works best for you both?

I will give you a call soon to have a quick chat about your day and set-up a meeting to discuss further.

Cheers!

A Flat-Out Wedding Professional

Woman using the smartphone

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